Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Why I Don't Like "Like"

Have you ever been in a conversation with someone and felt like they were not listening? Your conversation begins and the other person suddenly takes a deep interest in the dust bunnies in the corner. Or you go to the doctor and explain that you are using mindfulness meditation to help with your panic attacks and he says, "uh huh, that's nice."
"Uh huh, that's nice."
On social media, I've written blogs and micro-blog posts and from some comments it's pretty obvious that the person really didn't read what I wrote. To me, that's the on-line equivalent of not listening. We can usually tell when someone isn't paying attention (not listening) by their irrelevant or off-target comments.

The Facebook "Like" function provides an icon which, with just one-click, informs the writer that you have "liked" their Facebook post. But what does that mean? Did they read the post and find it compelling? Do they agree with you? Do they really "like" what you wrote or is it an on-line equivalent of "uh huh, that's nice?"

Do they really "like" what you wrote or is it an on-line equivalent of "Uh huh, that's nice?" 

In a previous post, I noted that social media brings out aspects of my personality of which I am not proud. I confess that, like many people, I've been guilty of "drive-by" likings: I just bring up my news feed, not really reading a posting but just clicking "like" and moving on.

I don't like the fact that I do that.  

As noted in a recent article in UU World (Unitarian Universalist Association) by Christine C Robinson and Alicia Hawkins titled Listen Thickly, "the world is hungry for sharing soul to soul."
Yet social media sites like Facebook and Twitter are designed for quick connections. Unfortunately, that brings out superficial behavior in me.
Social media is one component of interpersonal communications; let's not make it the only one.
I want to be more authentic in my relationships, even on line. I want to be connected by more than electronics and "drive-by likes." I want to listen thickly rather than listen thinly and I want to be heard.

Social media is the current landscape, and I can't change that. But social media is one component of interpersonal communications; let's not make it the only one.

Source: pixdaus.com/unnamed-statue-listening-cell-phone/items/view/17629/
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